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Wizz Inflight Magazine about Georgian Wine

Wizz Inflight Magazine about Georgian Wine

3 April 2015

Sarah May Grunwald, sommelier, professor of wine and owner of Taste of Georgia (tastegeorgia.co) is publishing an article in Wizz Inflight Magazine about Georgian wine. The author of the article together with the rich cultural-historical heritage of Georgia talks about traditional Georgian method of winemaking and wine storage with egg-shaped terracotta vessel known as qvevri that has been recognized by UNESCO as protected intangible heritage.

It is important to note that each issue of Wizz Inflight Magazine gets 2.8 million readers on average.

The magazine is available on this link.


ARTICLE:

GEORGIA

HERE WINE LIVES

Sarah May Grunwald, sommelier, professor of wine and owner of Taste of Georgia (tastegeorgia.co), explains what makes this historic occupation so important

At the crossroads of Europe and Asia, along the "eastern shores of the Black Sea, there is a fertile country surrounded by the stunning Caucasus Mountains. Tucked between Turkey, Armenia, Azerbaijan and Russia, rests this land of myths, legend and rich cultural identity. Georgia is the birthplace of wine; an honour it wears well with traditions inextricably linked to feasting, hospitality, Christianity and one of the world's most-loved drink.

Throughout the ages despite the efforts of foreign invaders the Georgians have managed to sustain their cultural identity. Vine is the symbol of both country and people evident as grape motifs are everywhere. No other country on earth can boast such a long and continuous tradition of winemaking as Georgia, with a technique dating back 8,000 years.

Since the beginning, Georgians have used a simple egg-shaped terracotta vessel known as a qvevri. The qvevri forms the heart of traditional Georgian winemaking and wine storage, and has been recognized by UNESCO as protected intangible heritage.

The best way to experience this mystical land with its mountains, wines and opulent cultural tapestry is to visit it. Georgian supra (feast) in the hands of an experienced tamada (toastmaster) is a magical experience.

Kakheti, Georgia's primary wine region can be found just a one-hour drive from its capital city, Tbilisi. Guests can experience the ancient winemaking methods of the Alaverdi monks, who have been making traditional qvevri wine for more than 1,000 years. Visit also the gorgeous hilltop town Sighnaghi.

It's at the Georgian table that travelers truly experience Georgian culture. It's the link they share today with their Neolithic ancestors. Drinking Georgian wine is remembering our collective past

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